Miriam Ticktin presents annual Elizabeth Colson lecture at Oxford University

Miriam Ticktin, Associate Professor of Anthropology and co-director of the Zolberg Institute on Migration and Mobility, delivered the annual Elizabeth Colson lecture in June 2015 at the Refugee Studies Centre at the University of Oxford, England. In the talk titled “Innocence: Understanding a Political Concept,” Ticktin explored the idea of innocence in the context of humanitarianism, and the roles of “the child, the trafficked victim, the migrant, asylum seeker, the enemy combatant and the animal.” Ticktin has also been awarded a one-year fellowship at Princeton University’s Institute for Advanced Study for this academic year.

Listen to Ticktin’s full lecture below.

Bio | Ticktin received her PhD in Anthropology at Stanford University and the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales in Paris, France, and an MA in English Literature from Oxford as a Rhodes Scholar.  Professor Ticktin works at the intersections of the anthropology of medicine and science, law, and transnational and postcolonial feminist theory. She is co-editor of the journal Humanity: An International Journal of Human Rights, Humanitarianism and Development. Her most recent book, Casualties of Care: Immigration and the Politics of Humanitarianism in France (University of California Press, 2011), was awarded one of two 2012 William A. Douglass Prizes in Europeanist Anthropology by Society for the Anthropology of Europe. Recent publications include “Transnational Humanitarianism“ (Annual Review of Anthropology, 2014), “Cross-species craziness: Animals, Anthropomorphism and Mental Illness” (Books Forum, Biosocieties, 2014) and “Humanitarianism as Planetary Politics” in At the Limits of Justice: Women of Colour on Terror (University of Toronto Press, 2014).