Banu Bargu delivers keynote address at SOAS University of London

Banu Bargu, Associate Professor of Politics, presented a keynote lecture at SOAS University of London in October 2015 called “Why did Bouazizi Burn Himself? Fatal Politics and the Politics of Fate.”

Her book, Starve and Immolate: The Politics of Human Weapons (Columbia University Press, 2014), was awarded the 2015 First Book Award from the Foundations of Political Theory Section of the American Political Science Association, she has also recently published two articles: one on self-destructive protest (Angelaki: Journal of the Humanities, 2014) and another on enforced disappearances (Qui Parle: Critical Humanities and Social Sciences, 2014).

Listen to the keynote below.


Bio | Bargu received her PhD from Cornell University in 2008. Her main area of specialization is political theory, especially modern and contemporary political thought, with a thematic focus on theories of sovereignty, resistance, and biopolitics. Since publishing the book Starve and Immolate: The Politics of Human Weapons, Bargu is currently working on a book-length manuscript on rethinking the materialist tradition, especially in light of the posthumous publication of Louis Althusser’s work on the aleatory. 

Choose a publication to learn more.

Miriam Ticktin presents annual Elizabeth Colson lecture at Oxford University

Miriam Ticktin, Associate Professor of Anthropology and co-director of the Zolberg Institute on Migration and Mobility, delivered the annual Elizabeth Colson lecture in June 2015 at the Refugee Studies Centre at the University of Oxford, England. In the talk titled “Innocence: Understanding a Political Concept,” Ticktin explored the idea of innocence in the context of humanitarianism, and the roles of “the child, the trafficked victim, the migrant, asylum seeker, the enemy combatant and the animal.” Ticktin has also been awarded a one-year fellowship at Princeton University’s Institute for Advanced Study for this academic year.

Listen to Ticktin’s full lecture below.


Bio | Ticktin received her PhD in Anthropology at Stanford University and the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales in Paris, France, and an MA in English Literature from Oxford as a Rhodes Scholar.  Professor Ticktin works at the intersections of the anthropology of medicine and science, law, and transnational and postcolonial feminist theory. She is co-editor of the journal Humanity: An International Journal of Human Rights, Humanitarianism and Development. Her most recent book, Casualties of Care: Immigration and the Politics of Humanitarianism in France (University of California Press, 2011), was awarded one of two 2012 William A. Douglass Prizes in Europeanist Anthropology by Society for the Anthropology of Europe. Recent publications include “Transnational Humanitarianism“ (Annual Review of Anthropology, 2014), “Cross-species craziness: Animals, Anthropomorphism and Mental Illness” (Books Forum, Biosocieties, 2014) and “Humanitarianism as Planetary Politics” in At the Limits of Justice: Women of Colour on Terror (University of Toronto Press, 2014).

Nancy Fraser receives honorary doctorate from University of Liège

Nancy Fraser,  Henry Loeb Professor of Philosophy and Politics, was recently awarded an honorary doctorate from the University of Liège, Belgium. The other honorees included Judith Butler (UC Berkeley) and Caryl Phillips (Yale University). Fraser joined Phillips for a conversation at University of Liège in October, which can be viewed here.

Below is a brief overview produced by University of Liège about this year’s recipients of the honorary doctorate.


Bio | Fraser received her Ph.D. in philosophy from City University of New York in 1980. She specializes in the areas of social and political theory, feminist theory, 19th and 20th century European thought, and philosophy of social science. Fraser has received five honorary doctorates since 2006. Fraser has published fourteen books, and over 80 scholarly articles, book chapters, and essays. In 2013, Fraser published the book Fortunes of Feminism: From State-Managed Capitalism to Neoliberal Crisis (Verso Books). Her scholarship is the subject of several edited volumes, from the 2007 book, (Mis)recognition, Social Inequality and Social Justice: Nancy Fraser and Pierre Bourdieu (Routledge) to the forthcoming Justice, Criticism, and Politics in the 21st Century (UNSAM, Argentina).

Choose a publication below to learn more.

Miriam Steele: Breaking Cycles of Neglect Using Attachment Research

“I never get to see myself from the outside, I’m always judging myself from the inside,” reports a parent participating in a New School-Albert Einstein Medical Center clinical research collaboration directed by New School for Social Research psychologist Miriam Steele and her colleagues. Steele suggests that stepping outside of the interaction prompts reflective functioning, a theoretical framework she developed with her collaborator and husband Howard Steele over a decades-long examination of parent-child attachment. They have used the lens of attachment research to examine everything from the intergenerational links in parent-child relationships, intervention approaches to address child maltreatment, adoption, and the development of body image. She describes her work as bridging “the world of psychoanalytic thinking and clinical practice with contemporary research in child development.” In the course of our recent conversation it became clear that, for Steele, to research is to learn, to teach, and to help people – and to discover the next big question.

Group Attachment-Based Intervention

Steele’s focus is a psychological intervention called Group Attachment-Based Intervention (GABI), and she assesses its impact in a randomly controlled trial, federally funded by the Human Resources Services Administration.  The research team – comprised of faculty and graduate students at NSSR, as well as clinicians and researchers from Albert Einstein College of Medicine – brings together parents and young children from the Bronx for a thrice-weekly session of a group-based clinical treatment. As described in her co-authored article, Looking from the outside in: the use of video in attachment-based interventions (Attachment & Human Development, 2014), GABI is designed “to reach parents with histories of multiple adverse childhood experiences and ongoing exposure to poverty, domestic and neighborhood violence and risk of child maltreatment.”  This intervention grew out of a community-based intervention, setting it apart from interventions conceptualized in an academic setting and then delivered to patients.

The project started with one fundamental assertion, said Steele: “We know from neurobiology that well-nurtured brains look different from those that are not. That’s been well documented. The question is, how can we bring about change ?” Steele thinks that such a transformation in a parent could be brought on in part by an important aspect of the intervention: a parent watching video footage of her interactions with her child and being asked to reflect on what she sees while also hearing the reflections from her peers in the group.

Continue reading “Miriam Steele: Breaking Cycles of Neglect Using Attachment Research”

Selected Faculty Achievements, 2015

The Faculty of the New School for Social Research are actively publishing books and scholarly articles. Below are some highlights of faculty-published research and research-related awards they have received this year.

Politics

fraser_bookNancy Fraser, Henry Loeb Professor of Philosophy and Politics, has been awarded an honorary doctorate from the University of Liège, Belgium for her work and commitment to society.

Fraser received her Ph.D. in philosophy from City University of New York in 1980. She specializes in the areas of social and political theory, feminist theory, 19th and 20th century European thought, and philosophy of social science. Fraser has received five honorary doctorates since 2006. Fraser has published fourteen books, and over 80 scholarly articles, book chapters, and essays. In 2013, Fraser published the book Fortunes of Feminism: From State-Managed Capitalism to Neoliberal Crisis (Verso Books). Her scholarship is the subject of several edited volumes, from the 2007 book, (Mis)recognition, Social Inequality and Social Justice: Nancy Fraser and Pierre Bourdieu (Routledge) to the forthcoming Justice, Criticism, and Politics in the 21st Century (UNSAM, Argentina).

Read Fraser’s 2014 article, Behind Marx’s Hidden Abode, in the New Left Review.

Bargu_StarveandImmolateBanu Bargu, Associate Professor of Politics, received the 2015 First Book Award from the Foundations of Political Theory Section of the American Political Science Association this September. The book, Starve and Immolate: The Politics of Human Weapons, was published by Columbia University Press in 2014. From the publisher:

Starve and Immolate tells the story of leftist political prisoners in Turkey who waged a deadly struggle against the introduction of high security prisons by forging their lives into weapons. Weaving together contemporary and critical political theory with political ethnography, Banu Bargu analyzes the death fast struggle as an exemplary though not exceptional instance of self-destructive practices that are a consequence of, retort to, and refusal of the increasingly biopolitical forms of sovereign power deployed around the globe.

Banu Bargu received her PhD from Cornell University in 2008. Her main area of specialization is political theory, especially modern and contemporary political thought, with a thematic focus on theories of sovereignty, resistance, and biopolitics. Her research is situated at the intersection of philosophy, politics, history, and political anthropology, with a regional focus on the Middle East, especially Turkish politics. Bargu’s work draws upon the traditions of continental and critical theory as well as the history of Western political thought, with a keen interest in interrogating these traditions from the perspective of salient political issues and current resistance practices. Since publishing the book Starve and Immolate: The Politics of Human Weapons, Bargu is currently working on a book-length manuscript on rethinking the materialist tradition, especially in light of the posthumous publication of Louis Althusser’s work on the aleatory.

Read her most recent articles on self-destructive protest (Angelaki: Journal of the Humanities, 2014) and enforced disappearances (Qui Parle: Critical Humanities and Social Sciences, 2014).

Continue reading “Selected Faculty Achievements, 2015”